Woman warrior by maxine hong kingston essay

No Name Woman Summary Kingston learns from her mother that she once had an aunt who killed herself and her newborn baby by jumping into the family well in China. The night that the baby was born, the villagers raided and destroyed the family house, and the woman gave birth in a pigsty. The next morning the mother found her sister-in-law and the baby plugging up the well. The woman had brought such disgrace upon her family that they decided to pretend that she had never been born.

Woman warrior by maxine hong kingston essay

As a first-generation Chinese American, she struggles to reconcile her Chinese cultural heritage with her emerging sense of herself as an American. This aunt, whom Kingston names No Name Woman because her real name is never spoken by the family, becomes pregnant while her husband is working in America.

When No Name Woman no longer can hide her pregnancy from her family and her village, the villagers destroy the family home as punishment for her adultery.

Woman warrior by maxine hong kingston essay

After giving birth in a pigsty, she kills herself and the baby by drowning in the family well. In the second chapter, "White Tigers," Kingston recalls the legend of Fa Mu Lan, a woman warrior who leads her people to victory in battle.

Like Fa Mu Lan, she imagines herself leaving home at seven years of age and being brought up by martial arts teachers.

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She becomes a great warrior, triumphantly returning to her home to save her people. After giving birth to two children in China, Brave Orchid takes the unusual step of attending medical school, after which she works as a doctor in her home village and becomes a very successful healer.

Eventually, she gives up her career to join her husband in America. However, unable to practice medicine in America, she and her husband open a laundry business in California. However, after many years of practicing medicine in Los Angeles, he remarried and abandoned Moon Orchid, who remained in Hong Kong waiting for him to send for her.

Brave Orchid, determined to have Moon Orchid confront this irresponsible man, arranges for her sister to immigrate to America, but when Moon Orchid finally faces her husband, he again rejects her and chides her for disrupting his life and career.

Moon Orchid subsequently goes mad, ending her days in an insane asylum. In the last chapter, "A Song for a Barbarian Reed Pipe," in which Kingston describes her childhood emotional experiences and the conflicts she felt growing up in a Chinese household in America, she depicts the pains of finding a personal identity and a voice to express herself to her parents and a society that do not understand her.In Maxine Hong Kingston's novel, The Woman Warrior, eNotes Study Guides describes several themes.

While a search for identity and self is the primary . A summary of Chapter One: No Name Woman in Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Woman Warrior and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

A summary of Chapter One: No Name Woman in Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior.

After graduation from the To Keung School, Brave Orchid returns home to perform what services?

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Woman Warrior and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

- The Woman Warrior Argumentative Essay Maxine Hong Kingston’s novel The Woman Warrior is a series of narrations, vividly recalling stories she has heard throughout her life. These stories clearly depict the oppression of woman in Chinese society.

This descriptive essay researches the story about the Woman Warrior, wrote by Maxine Hong Kingston, that happened in ancient China. This essay follows the story, in which the sister-in-law's ordeals and her pregnancy, while her partner having been gone for many years. . The Woman Warrior Maxine Hong Kingston (Born Maxine Ting Ting Hong) American autobiographer, novelist, journalist, essayist, and short story writer.

The following entry provides analysis and.

SparkNotes: The Woman Warrior: Chapter One: No Name Woman