Same sex marriages viewpoints and theories

See Article History Alternative Titles: Although same-sex marriage has been regulated through law, religion, and custom in most countries of the world, the legal and social responses have ranged from celebration on the one hand to criminalization on the other.

Same sex marriages viewpoints and theories

See Article History Alternative Titles: Although same-sex marriage has been regulated through law, religion, and custom in most countries of the world, the legal and social responses have ranged from celebration on the one hand to criminalization on the other.

Some scholars, most notably the Yale professor and historian John Boswell —94have argued that same-sex unions were recognized by the Roman Catholic Church in medieval Europe, although others have disputed this claim. Scholars and the general public became increasingly interested in the issue during the late 20th century, a period when attitudes toward homosexuality and laws regulating homosexual behaviour were liberalized, particularly in western Europe and the United States.

The issue of same-sex marriage frequently sparked emotional and political clashes between supporters and opponents. By the early 21st century, several jurisdictions, both at the national and subnational levels, had legalized same-sex marriage; in other jurisdictions, constitutional measures were adopted to prevent same-sex marriages from being sanctioned, or laws were enacted that refused to recognize such marriages performed elsewhere.

That the same act was evaluated so differently by various groups indicates its importance as a social issue in the early 21st century; it also demonstrates the extent to which cultural diversity persisted both within and among countries.

For tables on same-sex marriage around the world, in the United States, and in Australia, see below. Cultural ideals of marriage and sexual partnership Perhaps the earliest systematic analyses of marriage and kinship were conducted by the Swiss legal historian Johann Jakob Bachofen and the American ethnologist Lewis Henry Morgan ; by the midth century an enormous variety of marriage and sexual customs across cultures had been documented by such scholars.

Notably, they found that most cultures expressed an ideal form of marriage and an ideal set of marriage partners, while also practicing flexibility in the application of those ideals. Among the more common forms so documented were common-law marriage ; morganatic marriagein which titles and property do not pass to children; exchange marriagein which a sister and a brother from one family marry a brother and a sister from another; and group marriages based on polygyny co-wives or polyandry co-husbands.

Ideal matches have included those between cross-cousinsbetween parallel cousins, to a group of sisters in polygyny or brothers in polyandryor between different age sets. In many cultures the exchange of some form of surety, such as bride service, bridewealthor dowryhas been a traditional part of the marriage contract.

Cultures that openly accepted homosexuality, of which there were many, generally had nonmarital categories of partnership through which such bonds could be expressed and socially regulated. Conversely, other cultures essentially denied the existence of same-sex intimacy, or at least deemed it an unseemly topic for discussion of any sort.

Religious and secular expectations of marriage and sexuality Over time the historical and traditional cultures originally recorded by the likes of Bachofen and Morgan slowly succumbed to the homogenization imposed by colonialism. Although a multiplicity of marriage practices once existed, conquering nations typically forced local cultures to conform to colonial belief and administrative systems.

Whether Egyptian, Vijayanagaran, Roman, Ottoman, Mongol, Chinese, European, or other, empires have long fostered or, in some cases, imposed the widespread adoption of a relatively small number of religious and legal systems. By the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the perspectives of one or more of the world religions— BuddhismHinduismJudaismIslamand Christianity —and their associated civil practices were often invoked during national discussions of same-sex marriage.

Perhaps because systems of religion and systems of civil authority often reflect and support each other, the countries that had reached consensus on the issue by the early s tended to have a single dominant religious affiliation across the population; many such places had a single, state-sponsored religion.

This was the case in both Iran, where a strong Muslim theocracy had criminalized same-sex intimacy, and Denmarkwhere the findings of a conference of Evangelical Lutheran bishops representing the state religion had helped smooth the way for the first national recognition of same-sex relationships through registered partnerships.

In other cases, the cultural homogeneity supported by the dominant religion did not result in the application of doctrine to the civic realm but may nonetheless have fostered a smoother series of discussions among the citizenry: Belgium and Spain had legalized same-sex marriage, for instance, despite official opposition from their predominant religious institution, the Roman Catholic Church.

The existence of religious pluralities within a country seems to have had a less determinate effect on the outcome of same-sex marriage debates. In some such countries, including the United Statesconsensus on this issue was difficult to reach. On the other hand, the Netherlands —the first country to grant equal marriage rights to same-sex couples —was religiously diverseas was Canadawhich did so in Most of the world religions have at some points in their histories opposed same-sex marriage for one or more of the following stated reasons:Sep 26,  · Same-sex marriage, the practice of marriage between two men or between two women.

Although same-sex marriage has been regulated through law, religion, and custom in most countries of the world, the legal and social responses have ranged from celebration on the one hand to .

Same sex marriages viewpoints and theories

Apr 07,  · Thus, same-sex marriages contracted in Connecticut or MA (and now Vermont) are not recognized by the federal government.

Passage of same-sex marriage affects MY rights and all the rights of. By allowing same-sex marriages in every state and every country, it would, very quickly, become something natural and discrimination would decrease dramatically.

Also, in regard to the categorical imperative, by treating gays and lesbians as an end and not a means, there is equality.

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Apr 07,  · Vermont on Tuesday became the fourth state to legalize gay marriage-- and the first to do so with a legislature's lausannecongress2018.comt was the first state to legalize civil unions for same-sex couples and. Transcript of same sex marriage conflict theory - SOC final project.

Same Sex Marriage through Conflict Theorists Eyes The Two Sides Conflict Theory Consequences in Society Benefits to Society 1) Society is a system of social . By allowing same-sex marriages in every state and every country, it would, very quickly, become something natural and discrimination would decrease dramatically.

Also, in regard to the categorical imperative, by treating gays and lesbians as an end and not a means, there is equality.

Ethical arguments against same-sex marriage laws - ABC Religion & Ethics